Pro wrestlers fearing gambling addictions

 
 

In recent history of professional wrestling, many star names of the sport became infused with dangerous out-of-ring habits such as alcohol and drug abuse.

However, a new threat has surfaced, with a gambling addiction now the biggest fear amongst pro wrestlers.

Wrestlers, including superstars of WWE, can develop bad brain damage while flying from the ropes and having their heads pounded by opponents.

Due to the head trauma that is suffered while partaking in wrestling, often it leads to athletes possibly undertaking a serious gambling addiction.

In the current climate it would be much easier for the stars to gain simple access to betting and casino sites, where they can ease the pressure on a gambling compulsion.

The dependency could cause top names in WWE, like CM Punk, Stone Cold Steve Austin or The Rock, to part with their prize money winnings in various forms of betting, such as online betting outlets like www.gamingclub.com.

In the old days of wrestling, flambouant legends like Ric Flair, would often be filmed waging massive amounts around USA casinos, as the thousands of fans watched on in admiration.

While in modern day, cases such as Chris Benoit have brought shock upon the wrestling community. The news almost brought down not just the WWE, but the entire business of professional wrestling when Benoit committed a double-murder, killing his wife and son, then committed suicide in 2007.

After an autopsy on the Canadian’s body, doctors found that his brain was so severely damaged, it resembled the brain of an 85-year-old Alzheimer’s patient.

Benoit’s tragedy sent shock waves around the entertainment world, the reported damage to the wrestler’s brain proving everyone involved is at risk.

Sports stars outside of wrestling can be affected too, violent contact sports such as boxing, put the athletes at a risk of picking up consequential head injuries.

Doctors refer to ‘chronic boxer’s encephalopathy’ or ‘punch-drunk symptom’, a critical condition suffered when fighters receive repeated concussive blows, resulting in irreversible damage. This causes problems with memory, speech, suicidal thoughts and ultimately, dementia.

With regards to medication and help, recent research has revealed that drugs can sometimes have an opposite effect.

Drugs usually prescribed to treat Parkinson’s disease, commonly associated with wrestlers and boxers, increase the risk of behaviours such as compulsive shopping and gambling, research has found.

This can be dangerous, as problems can be extensions of existing traits, for example someone who has always enjoyed a harmless flutter might develop more of a very harmful gambling problem.